INSPIRATIONS: THE LIFE OF A GREAT PREACHER JOHN G. LAKE BY TRIUMPHANTRADIO ADMIN

John Glake the healing evangelist who was born in the city of Ontario Canada on March 18, 1870. When he was small his family moved to Michigan, in the United States. While he was still young, Lake attended a Salvation Army meeting and became convicted of his need for a savior, and he invited Jesus to become Lord of life. Lake was incredibly impacted by illness. He was one of sixteen children, and over the course of his young life eight of them died. He grew to hate the sickness, grief, and death that was so much a part of his family life.

THE MINISTERIAL CALL
Lake felt a call to the ministry, and studied to become a Methodist minister. He took to heart the Methodist teaching on sanctification and sought it passionately. When his studies were done, however, he made a decision to go into business and start a newspaper in Illinois. Then he moved back to Michigan and began a career in real estate. He met Jennie Stevens and married her
Sickness still continued to hound Lake. His brother was an invalid, one sister had extensive cancer, another sister had bleeding problems, and his wife had tuberculosis and heart disease. In 1899 the family had heard about John Alexander Dowie, in Chicago, because he was receiving substantial media attention. They took Lake’s brother to the healing rooms in Chicago, and he was instantly healed. Both sisters then went, as well, and were also healed. Finally, Lake had contacted people to pray for his wife in June of 1899, and she was also healed. He opened the scriptures to see Acts 10:38 “You know of Jesus of Nazareth, how God anointed Him with the Holy Spirit and with power, and how He went about doing good, and healing all who were oppressed by the devil; for God was with Him. (NASB) He saw outlined clearly for himself that Jesus is the healer and Satan is the oppressor of men. Lake became a member of Dowie’s Christian Catholic Church and a branch was opened in Sault Ste Marie, where he was living at the time. Lake became a deacon in the new church. In August 1900 Lake’s wife Jennie was accidently shot by her 4 year old son. Following Dowie’s teachings the Lakes refused medical help and depended on prayer. The event was so startling an article was written up in the Chicago Daily Tribune, which regularly reported on Dowie’s activities.

In 1904 Lake moved to Chicago to work with Dowie. Seeing the power of God, Lake began to cry out for more of the Holy Spirit. He spent nine months seeking a fuller level of the presence of God. Lake went, with another man to pray for a sick woman. God’s presence fell on and over him like he’d never known before. The next six months were marked by conviction, repentance, and heart cleansing. The gifts of the Spirit became magnified, and the discernment and healing giftings increased dramatically. Lake was receiving training under John Alexander Dowie, but did not always agree with his way of doing things. At one point, Dowie listed his accomplishments and told him “If you ever develop constructive qualities, equal to your critical capacity, you will be a greater man than I am.” John Lake knew that he would have to start his own work. He felt called to Africa and went there in 1908, after a short-term pastoring stint in Indianapolis. Over a five year period in South Africa Lake saw 1,000,000 converts, planted hundreds of churches, and raised up over 1000 local ministers. The work was strenuous, however, and his wife died in December 1908. He committed to keep his family together. In 1913 Lake returned to the United States, with his seven children.
There is also renewed interest in Dr. Lake’s teachings, which cover every area of healing. Dr. Lake taught that any Christian should be able to heal the sick, saying, “All that is needed, is for the person praying…to let the tangible Spirit of God flow through them into the sick person.”

Dr. Lake goes on to say, “The Spirit of God is just as tangible as electricity is. You handle it, you minister it to another, you receive it from God through faith and prayer, your person becomes supercharged with it. The old apostle (Paul) took handkerchiefs or aprons, and held them in his hands until the handkerchiefs or aprons were supercharged with the Spirit of God. Then they were sent to the sick, the sick were healed and the demons were cast out of them. Acts 19:12

“It is one of the most difficult things in all the world for people who are not familiar with the ministry of healing to comprehend that the Spirit of God is tangible, actual, a living quantity, just as real as electricity, just as real as any other native force. Yes, and a good deal more so.

“If we could make the world understand the pregnant vitality of the Spirit of God, men would discover that healing is … a perfectly scientific application of God’s Spirit to man’s needs.”

John Lake had a remarkable ministry. His legacy includes not only his books and writings, but also a foundation of thought that has played an important role in the growing presence of divine healing in our world. He helps us understand that even ordinary believers can consecrate themselves to God and learn to minister the gifts of healing.

MUSIC: Eben Ft. Nathaniel Bassey – No One Like You | @eben4u @nathanielblows

International Gospel Artiste EBEN “Emmanuel Benjamin” team up with Nathaniel Bassey to release a wonderful worship flow titled No One like you, under the Hammer records.

No on like you is a powerful spirit driven worship song, declaring no one like God in all ways.

Enjoy, Download and Share below

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OUR SINS HELD HIM ON THE CROSS

On Good Friday, we celebrate the death and the cross in history.
Blood streamed down his face. Massive thorns stuck to the head of their Maker. Groans of agony came from the mouth of him who spoke the world into being. The soldiers beat him. They flogged him. They tortured him.

As he inched through the streets of Jerusalem, his cross pressing into his lacerated back, many shuddered at him. The face of God, which Moses could not look at and live, could no longer even be recognized as human (Isaiah 52:14). Women hid their children from the bloody mass of flesh before them. Men taunted him. Soldiers clubbed him. Angels shrieked in horror.

Every prophecy about his suffering was being fulfilled. By judgment and oppression, he was taken away. His sheep scattered when their enemies struck him. One of his own sold him and betrayed him with a kiss. He found no rest as they beat him, spit on him, and mocked him through the night. In the morning, he gave his back to those who struck him, his cheeks to those who plucked his beard.

He stepped forward to Calvary as a lamb to the slaughter.

His Love Was Rated-R
I remember the first time I watched The Passion of the Christ fourteen years ago. The sight of Roman ninetails sinking their claws into his back seemed to pierce my soul with Mary’s (Luke 2:35). The blood. The screams. The anguish. I could never again thoughtlessly tell others that Christ died for them. The scene forbade cliché. It was grizzly, ghastly, gruesome — rated-R.

I rarely cry, but as I watched Jesus shed his blood all over the Roman courtyard, I could not help but weep. As they held the nails over his hands and feet — his mother watching him — every swing of the hammer pierced my heart. Only the heartless could watch unfeelingly. Has there ever been a more tragic scene?

I did not consider his wounds enough. I did not weep over his suffering as often as I felt I should have. But how does Jesus respond to me, and people like me, who take Good Friday to grieve over his unbearable sufferings? Two thousand years ago he said to those weeping for him that day, “Weep not for me; weep for yourselves.”

Silence on the Set
Of the many horrors of Calvary, one that was especially acute was the shame of it all (Hebrews 12:2). His was a public execution. The condemned usually were naked. To add to this, the prophecy reads, “All who see me mock me; they make mouths at me; they wag their heads” (Psalm 22:7). It is one thing to suffer; another to do so before a whole nation as they ridicule you.

But mockery was not the only sound made on his behalf. A host of women trailed behind him, lamenting the expiring prophet. They followed Jesus’s drops of blood — as so many of us do today — with drops of tears.

But upon hearing their sobs, Jesus, battered and broken, turned his face towards them and spoke these gracious, yet shocking words: “Daughters of Jerusalem, do not weep for me, but weep for yourselves and for your children” (Luke 23:28).

This part of the passion didn’t make the movie.

On that first Good Friday, Jesus turned to his loudest sympathizers — those who are not cursing him, mocking him, but wailing on his behalf — and silenced them. He commands their tears escort him no further. He opts to press into the night without their mourning.

Weep Not for Me
Jesus did not need their tears two millennia ago, and as unpopular as it may be, Jesus does not need our tears today. And this fact owes to us seeing his passion through the eyes of faith.

Weep not for me, he said. As if to say,

I am saving my people. I have prayed, tender souls, and know my Father’s will concerning this cup — shall I not drink it (John 18:11)? My hands willingly grasp this wood because my food is to do my Father’s will (John 4:32, 34). And his will is glorious: he sent me to serve and give my life as a ransom for my people. My body is broken, and my blood is spilled for you (Luke 22:19–20). Greater love has no one than this, that he lay down his life for his friends. Do not weep over the labor pains that give birth to your salvation and unshakable joy (John 16:20–22).

Weep not for me, as if to say,

I am not a helpless victim. I am a warrior-king with thousands of angels at my beck and call (Matthew 26:53). One word from me and this horror would end. One word from me and Rome would be destroyed. One word from me and all would be eternally condemned. But I was sent to save the world, not condemn it (John 3:17). Trust that no man — or army — can steal my life from me. I lay it down of my own accord, and I will take it up again (John 10:11–18).

Weep not for me, as if to say,

I am conquering. You see my heel being bruised and you mourn — but look through the eyes of faith and see the serpent’s skull trampled (Genesis 3:15). Although I walk as the Lamb, I conquer as the Lion — the predator, not the prey, will hang on the cross (Revelation 5:5–6). I am a King who shall rule the universe from a tree. And I shall make this cross my scepter. As they lift me up, I thrust my enemies under my feet as a footstool (Psalm 110:1). My triumphal entry is followed by a triumphal exit. Why should you weep over my hour of glorification (John 12:27–28)?

Weep not for me, as if to say,

Sunday is coming. I have said repeatedly that in three days I shall rise (Matthew 16:21; 17:22–23; 20:18–19). Although today is full of unutterable darkness, unimaginable pain, unthinkable terror, Sunday is coming. My Father’s perfect hand is crushing me, evil men are murdering me, my disciples have fled from me, but truly I tell you, Sunday is coming. Joy is set before me and empowers me to endure. A crown awaits me. An endless celebration awaits me. My blood-bought people await me. Eternal glory awaits me. My Father awaits me. Weep not for me.

Weep for Yourselves
Jesus does not stop their tears completely but redirects them: “Do not weep for me, but weep for yourselves and for your children.” God’s wrath will soon visit the people for their sin. The nation that rejected her Messiah — not Jesus — is to be pitied.

“Behold, the days are coming when they will say, ‘Blessed are the barren and the wombs that never bore and the breasts that never nursed!’ Then they will begin to say to the mountains, ‘Fall on us,’ and to the hills, ‘Cover us.’” (Luke 23:29–30)

“Weep for yourselves,” as if to say,

I can bear my cup, but you cannot bear yours. Rome will kill your children before your own eyes. The beast you conspire with today will surround you tomorrow. Your anguish will be so severe that it is better to collect these tears in a bottle to save for that dreadful day.

My sufferings will end at death; yours may not. Many of you will cry for the mountains to cover you, but that can only spare you from the judgment of Rome — it cannot spare you from the judgment of God. The hounds of his justice do not stop at death. He is God of both the living and the dead (Acts 10:42). Vengeance is his; he will repay (Hebrews 10:30). And it is a fearful thing to fall unshielded into the hands of the living God (Hebrews 10:31).

Weep for your sins. Gentle daughters, useless are the tears that fall on my behalf because of suffering but never fall because of sin. Many weep over my suffering, but not the sin which caused it. The horror you see before you is my becoming sin for my people and bearing the wrath they deserve, that they should have my righteousness (2 Corinthians 5:21). If you weep, better to weep over the lust that hammers the nail deeper, the lie that sticks a thorn in the brow, the cowardly duck that makes a gash upon me, the prideful strut that keeps me upon Calvary’s path.

It Was My Sin
I watched The Passion of the Christ each year for four years — being moved every time to tears — all while I was not truly born again. And I thought myself better for crying, as if my sins would be passed over if I had tears painted on my doorpost. It did not take a regenerate heart to weep over the sufferings of Jesus — our world is full of unbelievers who cry over sad things — but it did take a regenerate heart to mourn over what I rarely really mourned over: my sins (James 4:8–10).

And those who witnessed Jesus’s execution two thousand years ago didn’t see their sins in the cross either: “Who considered that he was cut off out of the land of the living, stricken for the transgression of my people?” (Isaiah 53:8). The horror stayed “over there,” while they remained innocent bystanders. They missed the point and beauty of the cross. They cried and cried, but had not love. Until we can truly sing, “It was my sin that held him there, until it was accomplished,” we weep for him in vain.

We should weep indeed at the foot of the cross, but not with pity. With faith. Those tears don’t dry up the Monday after Easter. Those tears mourn over the sin that nailed him there. Those tears sing over him as our conquering King. And those tears celebrate his death until he returns.

MUSIC: WE PROSPER – PRAISE2LIFE |@praise2life

winning Nigerian, Canadian based Gospel Artiste Praise2life has released a new song titled “WE PROSPER” a swing groovy song with a rich depth of the word of God.
Praise2life is a Singer,Songwriter and a musician, with a passion to share her love for God through music. She has three Albums to the glory of God, which got her an award as the best female Gospel artist (AEAWARDS) in Toronto,Canada 2013.
Traveling extensively in North America, her desire is to share her music with all believers worldwide, and her native country Nigeria.
Many of her songs are birthed in the place of prayer, which are like fire shut up in her bones.

This new song is a message to this generation to remember who we are in Christ, as we are the head and not the tail.
We are not meant to be conformed with the world cos we have the Light of Christ in us, We are the light of the world the city set upon the hill cannot be hid “Matt 5-14”. When we shine as God intended, we prosper and that is the covenant we have in Christ Jesus.

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iTunes Download link below

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Music: VICTORY DANCE – KELVIN iPRAISE | @KELVINiPRAISE

Fast rising Nigerian Gospel Artiste Kelvin iPraise as released another powerful hit song titled Victory Dance.
ThIS new track is sequel to his much-talked-about single ‘The Chosen One’ which was released in January.

This track assures of victory sought for, it also inspires listener to dance in view of an anticipated victory.

Meanwhile, the lyrics of the track is such that strikes in retrospect biblical king  David’s dance when the recovered Ark of the covenant was brought back to Jerusalem as recorded in 2Samuel chapter 6.

Unlike the debut single, Chosen One,  which has a slow raggea beat,  is patterned with a rather fast beat which is in consonance with its title, Victory Dance.

There is no gainsaying the fact that Kelvin iPraise is about taking his fans into a greater dimension of grace, as they proclaim victory worth leaping and dancing for like that of King David.

Victory dance is produced by Mr. Soul and it’s poised to give you a change of story.

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CHECK OUT CHOOSE ONE
CHOSEN ONE

Music: SAGE and TWcrew ft HESSKING – Worthy [Prod by Sanmi Matthew] || @sageandtwcrew @iamhessking

Fast rising gospel group Sage and twcrew has released a new song titled WORTHY featuring HESSKING. This release is off the 2nd Episode of the 3rd Worship Devotional Series.
This song has a traditional African eulogy with a contemporary blend, it is another new dimensional move by Sage and Twcrew inspiring the world with the Gospel news through their worship devotional series. Worthy is song to strengthen our faith in the God who is worthy of Praises, our existence and our lifes as this music takes you on a journey where God is accurately depicted in words from the western part of Nigeria. Stay Blessed

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Connect with SAGE and TWcrew @sageandtwcrew.
Connect with HESSKING @iamhessking.

MUSIC: Reckless Love – Israel Houghton

International award winning (Multi Grammy, Stellar and Dove Award) Gospel Artiste Israel Houghton unveils a RECKLESS LOVE after the long waiting.

Lyrics
“Reckless Love”
(originally by Cory Asbury)

Before I spoke a word, You were singing over me
You’ve been so, so good to me
Before I took a breath, You breathed Your life in me
You’ve been so, so kind to me

Oh, the overwhelming, never-ending, reckless love of God
Oh, it chases me down, fights ’til I’m found, leaves the ninety-nine
I couldn’t earn it, I don’t deserve it, still, You give Yourself away
Oh, the overwhelming, never-ending, reckless love of God

When I was Your foe, still Your love fought for me
You’ve been so, so good to me
When I felt no worth, You paid it all for me
You’ve been so, so kind to me

Oh, the overwhelming, never-ending, reckless love of God
Oh, it chases me down, fights ’til I’m found, leaves the ninety-nine
I couldn’t earn it, I don’t deserve it, still, You give Yourself away
Oh, the overwhelming, never-ending, reckless love of God

You keep chasing me down

There’s no shadow You won’t light up
Mountain You won’t climb up
Coming after me
There’s no wall You won’t kick down
Lie You won’t tear down
Coming after me

There’s no shadow You won’t light up
Mountain You won’t climb up
Coming after me
There’s no wall You won’t kick down
Lie You won’t tear down
Coming after me

There’s no shadow You won’t light up
Mountain You won’t climb up
Coming after me
There’s no wall You won’t kick down
Lie You won’t tear down
Coming after me

Oh, the overwhelming, never-ending, reckless love of God
Oh, it chases me down, fights ’til I’m found, leaves the ninety-nine
And I couldn’t earn it, I don’t deserve it, still, You give Yourself away
Oh, the overwhelming, never-ending, reckless love of God, yeah

I thank You, Lord
I thank You, Lord
I thank You, Lord

MUSIC: PRINCE PRAIZE RELEASES TWO NEW SINGLES “DULCE JESUS FEAT. TEEWORSHIP” AND “WEKO BIRO” | @balog_solomon @teeworship5

Nigerian fast rising gospel Artiste Prince Praize has released two new singles titled “Dulce Jesus” and “Weko Biro”.
Dulce Jesus is a powerful worship song with a reach depth featuring Teeworship, Dulce Jesus speaks more about the power in the name of Jesus.
Weko Biro an Igbo word meaning “Thank You” an expression of gratitude to God for all he has done. From our interview with Prince Praise he said most of his songs which are Igbo was by the inspiration of the Holy Ghost, in which he said he never speak Igbo.

Listen Download and Share.

DULCE JESUS


WEKO BIRO

ARTISTE PROFILE
Solomon Balogun Ozemede (Prince-Praize) was born to the family of Apostle and Mrs Lazarus Balogun Ozemede on the 27th of February, 1990 at Abeokuta, Ogun State. The ninth of eleven children, he attended St. Peters Catholic Nursery & Primary School before proceeding to Abeokuta Grammar School for his secondary education. Also, at a tender age, his singing prowess was discovered and this paved way for him in joining the choir of his family church in Abeokuta. By divine inspiration, he relocated to Abuja after completing his secondary education in 2009. Consequently, he joined the Redeemed Christian Church of God; Triumphant Sanctuary Zone, Airport Road Abuja where he was baptized by Pastor Adebola Aminu; now the National Church growth officer for FCT 7 in 2013. His love for God grew and passion for music knew no bounds and by divine direction, he joined the choir department. The gift and power of God was so mighty upon his ministry as he eventually rose to become the head of the same department.
After many years at RCCG Triumphant Sanctuary, he moved to RCCG Mercy Pavilion Lugbe, where he is presently the deputy head of the choir department. This responsibility was placed on him by divine inspiration under the leadership of Pastor Ibukun Babarinde. Solomon Balogun Ozemede ministry is indeed a blessing to many. He is God’s anointed battle axe with the divine mandate to turn around the lives of men and deliver them from the power of the devil through soul-lifting and power-packed song ministrations. To the glory of God, he has ministered in several programs, sharing the stage with great music ministers. Some of these programs include RCCG 74 Hours Marathon Messiah’s Praise, Songs of Worship and Halleluyah 400 Hours. Also, he is an active member of RCCG Region 10 Mass choir, Region 10 Youth Mass choir and RCCG FCT 4 Mass choir. Solomon Balogun Ozemede is a man of many things. He is the CEO of Solace Empire; a fashion design outfit with a unique touch that makes clothing for all genders. Also, he is a certified member of the Nigerian Institute of Purchasing and is currently studying for a degree at the National Open University of Nigeria, Abuja.

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